Tuesday, April 13th, 2021 |العربية
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Lebanese Families

Sulfur (‘Kebreet’ in Arabic) is a bright yellow chemical element with the symbol (S). There is sulfur in gunpowder and matches and the element is also used in agriculture and in the making of sulfuric acid, an important chemical in the production of paints and textiles. Raw sulfur can be...

‘Bahlawan’ is the Arabic equivalent of a person skilled at jesting and juggling who tries to astound his audience by performing graceful movements and extraordinary acts. The description, which is usually given to jugglers who pull off clever tricks with objects and money, is also the name of a...

Yasser Arafat, Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization and Head of the Palestinian National Authority later, is one of the most-widely recognized symbols of Palestinian resistance around the world. While his original name was Mohammad Abdul Raouf Arafat Al-Qudwa, there does not seem to be...

Several Lebanese families are named after fruits. Why they were fruit-inspired is uncertain but chances are the members of these families were either fruit-growers or fruit-lovers.

There are several families in Lebanon with linguistically inappropriate names. Most of their members are educated men who have earned high social and cultural standing, contrary to what that their family names imply. Of these are the families of Al- Jo’louk (meaning ‘erratic’), Al-So’louk...

Al-Sous families are among those small Lebanese families whose main presence is restricted to Saida, Zgharta and Beirut. Their inclusion of members who belong to the Israeli community is one of their most distinctive features.

There are hundreds of Lebanese families named after certain religious sects. Some of them are confined within one region and sect, while others spread across numerous regions and sects. The families are distributed as follows:

This article will explore the remaining Lebanese families named after Lebanese towns, which we examined in our previous issue. Some of these families are limited to one sect, while others are distributed among multiple ones. The common denominator however, is that none of them is present today in...

The following is the third in a series of articles that The Monthly has devoted to survey the families named after Lebanese towns and villages.

In the fourth part of the series on the family names denoting Lebanese towns and villages, The Monthly sheds light on the following families: